A SANG Fit For A Saint

If you are looking for a peaceful walk this autumn in a natural area then look no further than St Catherine’s Road SANG (Suitable Alternative Natural Green Space) in Frimley. Owned by Surrey Heath Borough Council, this former school playing field is a great place to wander through meadows and admire the trees whilst relaxing on the benches.

St Catherines Meadow before path cut

Before

The Blackwater Valley Volunteers have done a fantastic job cutting back the vegetation. It really opened up the area and makes you feel welcome.

Never content with just the one task, the volunteers also litter picked and cleaned the signs. Using there inventiveness and construction skills they then fixed a fence and one of the site signs that had rotted at the base.

Well done Paul, Mike, Edmund, Roger and Geoff!

Bench path view

After

Our tractors also had a chance to help. Stuart on the Kubota (seen above) helped cut back the bramble and our Massey tractor and mower attachment hay cut the meadows. This will help encourage wildflower species like Devil’s-bit Scabious to flourish.

Thank you to the volunteers for their help and the Surrey Heath Rangers for having us.

Countryside Ranger Jenny

 

 

 

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About blackwatervalleycountryside

The Blackwater Valley is located on the borders of Hampshire, Surrey and Berkshire and runs for approximately 30km from the source near Aldershot, northwards to Swallowfield. At its confluence it joins the rivers Whitewater and Loddon. The Loddon eventually flows into the River Thames near Reading. Work in the Blackwater Valley is co-ordinated by the Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership on behalf of the local authorities that border the Valley. Despite being surrounded by urban development the Valley provides an important green corridor for local residents As well as the Blackwater Valley Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a small part of the Basingstoke Canal SSSI, three nature reserves within the Valley catchment and many other areas have been recognised for their ecological importance. The local planning authorities covering the Valley have designated 31 other areas as ‘Wildlife Sites’.
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