Island Adventures at Moor Green Lakes

Last week there was a double task at Moor Green Lakes working on Long Island. On Tuesday we decended with the Blackwater Valley Volunteers to set up the pontoon crossing, motorscythe the bramble for a fire site and cut back the mainland willow. Our Long Island work of clearing the vegetation for over-wintering wildfowl is usually focused at the western end, where there are good views from the hide. This time we tackled the eastern end where the track access had become very overgrown. Also we exposed a hidden scrape where the shallow muddy ”bay’ is ideal for waders and invertebrates.

Anyway the team got stuck in felling trees on the narrow bund which separates the scrape from the main lake. I was surprised to discover that this scrape has a channel into the lake at both ends, so the central bund is in effect a baby island, hence lots of leaping across the gap and bridge building. On Thursday we were joined by the Blooming Marvellous Volunteers from Rushmoor Voluntary Service. Over both days it was great to get so much achieved and many thanks for everyone who helped.

Andrew turning in fire

Andrew turning in fire

Jenny and the Blooming Marvellous Volunteers

Jenny and the Blooming Marvellous Volunteers

Newly exposed scrape looking north east

Newly exposed scrape looking north east

View west before and after task

View west before and after task

Ranger Stuart

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About blackwatervalleycountryside

The Blackwater Valley is located on the borders of Hampshire, Surrey and Berkshire and runs for approximately 30km from the source near Aldershot, northwards to Swallowfield. At its confluence it joins the rivers Whitewater and Loddon. The Loddon eventually flows into the River Thames near Reading. Work in the Blackwater Valley is co-ordinated by the Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership on behalf of the local authorities that border the Valley. Despite being surrounded by urban development the Valley provides an important green corridor for local residents As well as the Blackwater Valley Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a small part of the Basingstoke Canal SSSI, three nature reserves within the Valley catchment and many other areas have been recognised for their ecological importance. The local planning authorities covering the Valley have designated 31 other areas as ‘Wildlife Sites’.
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