Grant’s Moor Appears!

The area of land known as Grants Moor, which lies between the railway line and the A331 from Farnborough Gate to Farnborough North Station, is being managed to enhance its wildlife value. Part of this work was the planting of two lots of 400 trees from the Woodland Trust, to form a new hedgerow.
The task undertaken on the 29th August was to clear the plant growth that would otherwise overwhelm the new hedge.
This years perfect growing conditions and the the breakdown of the Partnership’s mower, meant that the amount of growth to be cleared looked somewhat daunting, in fact it was impossible to see the hedge line in some places.
Grant's Moor Cutting
Nonetheless a small but gallant band of Trustees, with a volunteering member, gathered to take on this task. The Partnership came down on the day with equipment for us and a mower, driven by Mark, and power tools operated by Andrew and our one qualified Trustee John.
After a slow start, using just hand tools while the mower cut a path for the truck, we were able to get into a system of clearing the parts that the mower and hedge trimmer/ brush cutter could not reach and soon we were making good progress.
Grant's Moor Cutting 1
For a small group we managed to do a lot of work and got right through the double hedgerow, opening up the small trees to the autumn sunshine.
Grant's Moor Cutting 2
This amount of work would not have been possible without the help from the Partnership and it was great to see the way that the group worked together to get the job done.
Many thanks to Sue Cload, Peter Bolt,John Coupland, John Murrell, Mike Swaddling and Colin Wilson from the Trust and Andrew and Mark from the Partnership.

Bernard Baverstock – Trust Member

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About blackwatervalleycountryside

The Blackwater Valley is located on the borders of Hampshire, Surrey and Berkshire and runs for approximately 30km from the source near Aldershot, northwards to Swallowfield. At its confluence it joins the rivers Whitewater and Loddon. The Loddon eventually flows into the River Thames near Reading. Work in the Blackwater Valley is co-ordinated by the Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership on behalf of the local authorities that border the Valley. Despite being surrounded by urban development the Valley provides an important green corridor for local residents As well as the Blackwater Valley Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a small part of the Basingstoke Canal SSSI, three nature reserves within the Valley catchment and many other areas have been recognised for their ecological importance. The local planning authorities covering the Valley have designated 31 other areas as ‘Wildlife Sites’.
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