Hedging practise at Moor Green

Yesterday Steven, I, Chris and Mike trundled down to Moor Green to lay the car park hedge by the road. We set about clearing back to brambles and lifting the small oak, by cutting off the lower branches to raise the canopy. After a short interval paddling out to check the goats, the team set to work (1st pic).

We removed the old tree guards and used axes and billhooks to cut the stems most of the way through, so we could bend them over. This provides a much denser and stronger hedge, as it grows from the base, rather than simply cutting it all off at 3ft. We found the holly and hawthorn was nice and bendy, with most stems laying well and remaining attached. Two hawthorn stems were left as standards with the finished hedge looking great, so thanks to Chris & Mike (2nd pic)

We received lots of positive comments from visitors who agreed that the more visible car park should reduce recent antisocial behaviour, and thought the site was now much more inviting.

Ranger Stuart

 

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About blackwatervalleycountryside

The Blackwater Valley is located on the borders of Hampshire, Surrey and Berkshire and runs for approximately 30km from the source near Aldershot, northwards to Swallowfield. At its confluence it joins the rivers Whitewater and Loddon. The Loddon eventually flows into the River Thames near Reading. Work in the Blackwater Valley is co-ordinated by the Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership on behalf of the local authorities that border the Valley. Despite being surrounded by urban development the Valley provides an important green corridor for local residents As well as the Blackwater Valley Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a small part of the Basingstoke Canal SSSI, three nature reserves within the Valley catchment and many other areas have been recognised for their ecological importance. The local planning authorities covering the Valley have designated 31 other areas as ‘Wildlife Sites’.
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