Moor Green Lakes Tern Raft

Back in February the Rangers and volunteers worked hard to install two restored tern rafts on one of the lakes at Moor Green.  After a long day, filled with wet mud, cold water, a ton of gravel and lots of pushing and shoving we got them in place. Then a few months later we had a report that one tern raft had drifted across the lake to come to rest on one bank next to a bird hide, which caused a bit of confusion as they were well weighted down with anchors and chains to stop them moving in the cross winds.

Last Friday (23/08) Ranger Stuart and Student Tasha took the boat and new anchors out to Moor Green Lakes to see if they could return the raft back to its original position alongside the second raft.  The outboard motor decided not to work so both of them hard to work hard to row the raft back out to the middle of the lake where it turns out the rope had been cut.  It was replaced with chain to stop that happening again.

MGL Tern raft

MGL Tern raft

One returned Tern Raft, complete with satisfied customer perched on top!

Laura
Assistant Ranger

Advertisements

About blackwatervalleycountryside

The Blackwater Valley is located on the borders of Hampshire, Surrey and Berkshire and runs for approximately 30km from the source near Aldershot, northwards to Swallowfield. At its confluence it joins the rivers Whitewater and Loddon. The Loddon eventually flows into the River Thames near Reading. Work in the Blackwater Valley is co-ordinated by the Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership on behalf of the local authorities that border the Valley. Despite being surrounded by urban development the Valley provides an important green corridor for local residents As well as the Blackwater Valley Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a small part of the Basingstoke Canal SSSI, three nature reserves within the Valley catchment and many other areas have been recognised for their ecological importance. The local planning authorities covering the Valley have designated 31 other areas as ‘Wildlife Sites’.
This entry was posted in Conservation, Moor Green Lakes, Sites and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s